2 3 Ballet Webb: October 2016

Monday, October 31, 2016

Mad Monday Halloween



Mad Monday Halloween

In honor of Halloween, let us remember that there should never be any scary moments in ballet. That’s right. None. 

There can be breathtaking moments, moments of excitement, or moments of high expectation. But no scary moments, like a dancer falling down, a light crashing to the floor, or someone tumbling into the orchestra pit. Those are the scary moments I’m talking about.

A ballet can be scary, if designed to be so, but random scary moments are to be avoided, if at all possible.

Have a Happy Halloween!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #31:  
“There are no scary moments in ballet.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
Treats and tricks.
Witch broomsticks.
Jack-o-lanterns
Lick their lips.

Crows and cats.
Vampire bats.
Capes and fangs
And pointed hats.

Werewolves howl.
Phantoms prowl.
Halloween’s
Upon us now.”
Richelle E. Goodrich

                Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Sunday Limitations



Sunday Limitations

There is a saying by Richard Bach, that I have paraphrased today. The saying is: “Argue for your limitations, and sure enough they're yours." 

What does this mean? Well, how often have you focused on what you can’t do, instead of what you can, to the point of pulling yourself into a pit of despair. Ouch! Well,okay. We've all been guilty of this. This is arguing (if only with yourself) for your limitations.

So, stop arguing. If you argue about how horrible your pirouettes are, or your extension, or whatever, it prevents you from working to change it, and thus “you’ll get to keep” it. Instead, work to improve the weak areas consistently, but don’t obsess about it. Always work on the whole picture. And don’t forget to let yourself feel good about those things you are accomplishing or that you do well. It’s okay.
From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Motivational Secret #38:   
Don’t argue for your limitations or you’ll  get to keep them.

                Link of the Day:
Quote of the Day:
“Believe in your infinite potential. Your only limitations are those you set upon yourself.”
Roy T. Bennett, The Light in the Heart

                Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Saturday Shortcut Statute



Saturday Shortcut Statute

There are no shortcuts in ballet. Unless, of course you count Ballet Secrets. I guess those might be a kind of shortcut. But other than that, there are no shortcuts. If there were shortcuts, believe me, dancers would have found them. 

Ballet is the great equalizer. Few, if any, dancers have everything. If you have flexibility, you lack strength; if you are strong, you lack flexibility. No one has it all. Therefore everyone has to work, push, forge ahead with determination. There are no shortcuts.

Be thankful for the balletic gifts you have, and work on those you don’t have. Don’t take the common shortcut of using only those things you have and ignoring the others. It won’t work. There are no shortcuts in ballet.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Statute #89:  
“There are no shortcuts in ballet.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Short cuts make long delays.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

                Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Friday, October 28, 2016

Fun Friday Accelerator



Fun Friday Accelerator

A floor is a terrible thing to waste. Yet it happens all the time. The floor is a critical partner for dancers, but it often goes unrecognized. Sob. Yes, a floor holds you up. It also keeps you from falling into the basement. But it is so much more! 

Think of the floor as a giant accelerator. A magic accelerator, if you will. By pushing down into it, while sending an equal energy up, force (impetus) is produced for almost everything a dancer does, from tendues to grand jetés. Like pressing down on the accelerator of an automobile, pressing down on the floor allows movement. For a big, stationary thing like a floor, that’s pretty impressive.

Floors should therefore be recognized, used and celebrated.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #9eee:  
The floor is a magic accelerator.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Positive attitude enables you to go with passion and see possibility in every challenging circumstance. It was by that, that great achievers picked up metal scraps on the floor and saw machines built from it.”
Israelmore Ayivor, Michelangelo | Beethoven | Shakespeare: 15 Things Common to Great Achievers

                Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Throwback Thursday and Gerd Andersson



Throwback Thursday and Gerd Andersson

Born in Stockholm, Sweden on June 11, 1932, Gerd Gunvor Andersson was and actress and a dancer. Her younger sister, Bibi, was also an actress and they both appeared in Bergman films. Gerd’s  first role for Bergman was in Summer Interlude. She played the role of a ballerina.

Gerd Andersson trained at the Royal Swedish Ballet School and entered the company in 1948. She rose through the ranks and became ballerina (principal) in 1958. In 1959 she appeared on television with Gene Kelly and though this association became better known to American audiences.

She created the leading woman’s role in Antony Tudor’s  Echoes of Trumpets in 1963. In 1966 she lived in New York for six weeks on a Swedish government fellowship.

If you are in New York City, the Library of Performing Arts there (near Lincoln Center) has an interview with Gerd Andersson that can be viewed onsite –  at this time it is not available online, unfortunately.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #132:  
“Gerd Andersson was a Swedish actress and dancer who appeared with Gene Kelly.”

                Links of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Don't blow off another's candle for it won't make yours shine brighter.”
Jaachynma N.E. Agu

                Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page: