2 3 Ballet Webb: September 2014

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Terrific Tuesday Sandwich Cookie


Terrific Tuesday Sandwich Cookie

Yes, it is yet another image for correct posture.  This one is sweet.

When dancers are working on improving their posture, often the effort to engage the abdominals and lengthen the spine has an unwanted side effect:  the entire body becomes tense and the flow of movement from the upper body becomes impossible.

The difficulty here is that the upper body must remain relaxed, and the arms fluid, without making the lower torso and the legs wimpy.   So imagine a reconstructed sandwich cookie.
If the cookies is twisted apart and rebuilt with the cream filling on the top, and two solid cookies on the bottom, you have the image necessary for correct posture:  soft on top and solid on the bottom two-thirds.

Think about that the next time you have dessert!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #1gg:  
“Your posture is like a reconstructed sandwich cookie with the cream filling on the top and the solid cookies on the bottom.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
Think what a better world it would be if we all, the whole world, had cookies and milk about three o'clock every afternoon and then lay down on our blankets for a nap.”
-Barbara Jordan


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Monday, September 29, 2014

Marvelous Monday Music


Marvelous Monday Music

There are days when the struggle for technical perfection gets the better of us.  Those classes when nothing seems to be right and frustrations build.  When this happens try to focus on the music.

It is easy in the heat of the moment to forget about the music and concentrate on the extension, or turn-out or pirouettes, etc.  But the music is the backbone of everything!  All you have to do is watch a young child dancing and reacting to a piece of music and you’ll remember why you are dancing in the first place!

Music is the heart and soul of dance.  Listen to lots of different kinds of music as often as you can.  Listen when you are discouraged, and listen when you are feeling great.  Getting a familiarity with all kinds of music will help your technique.

It will also help your whole being!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #7dd:  
“Always be aware of the music.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.”
-Victor Hugo

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Sunday, September 28, 2014

Sunday and Misty Copeland


Sunday and Misty Copeland

Many of you may have seen the commercial featuring ballerina Misty Copeland that quotes a rejection letter she received from a ballet training academy that said she didn't have the correct body type for ballet, and at age 13 she was “too old” to be considered.  Well!

Those were some pretty discouraging words (to say the least) for a thirteen-year-old to hear.  So on those days when you feel discouraged, remember this young woman who now wants to serve as an example to those dancers who may hear similar discouraging words.

 Through hard work, determination, and the encouragement of other teachers who saw her potential, she not only achieved her goal of being a professional dancer, she is now working with one of the best ballet companies in the world.  Today Misty Copeland is a soloist with American Ballet Theatre.

And, she is serving as an inspiration to others. 

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #44:  
“Discouraged?  Remember Misty Copeland.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“If you really believe in what you're doing, work hard, take nothing personally and if something blocks one route, find another. Never give up.”
-          Laurie Notaro


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Saturday, September 27, 2014

Super Saturday Letter D


Super Saturday Letter D

When teaching rond de jambe à terre (on the ground) to beginners, I tell them that the foot moves in a half circle, making certain to hit tendu devant, à la seconde, and tendu derrière positions.  We trace the path slowly at first, talking about how to maintain the rotation in the working leg and the supporting leg.  All of this works well for older beginners.

But for younger children, images are particularly important.  So I tell them that their big toe is a big crayon and it must draw the curve of a giant letter D on the floor.  The upright and straight part of the D is wider than the curved part of the D, since it is done mainly with the bottom of the foot by rolling through the demi-pointe.  Later, the concepts of direction – en dedans and en dehors – are introduced.

So even if you aren't a young child, think of drawing a giant letter D during rond de jambes. 

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #22a:  
A rond de jambe inscribes a giant letter “D” on the floor.

                Link of the Day:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glLDBE96aBc

Quote of the Day:
“With the new day comes new strength and new thoughts.”
-Eleanor Roosevelt

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Friday, September 26, 2014

Fun Friday Not a Door


Fun Friday Not a Door

In passé or retiré, it is tempting to just push the knee back and call it turned-out.   And for appearances, this may work fine.  But the truth is, it is the rotation of the leg in the hip socket that should cause the knee to go back – not pushing it back like opening a swinging door.  It is a leg, not a door, as a teacher of mine used to say!

The reason is simple.  Using the rotation provides a secure position – it effectively “locks it in place”, whereas just pushing the knee back doesn’t provide this important benefit.  Given enough wind, a swinging door will, well, swing.  The same is true for a passé leg.

Since achieving a good, secure position is crucial for many things, including successful pirouettes, thought should always be given to producing a good, turn-out retiré by rotating the working leg, not pushing it backwards into place.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #3j:  
“ In retire, It is the rotation of the working leg that places the knee to the side.”

                 Fun Friday Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.”
-          Calvin Coolidge

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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Throwback Thursday and Sallie Wilson


Throwback Thursday and Sallie Wilson

Sallie Wilson was born in Fort Worth, Texas on April 18, 1932.  She studied ballet locally at first, then went to New York and joined Ballet Theater in 1949.  Only seventeen, she was shy and had little performing experience, and was soon dismissed.  However, someone had noticed her.

That someone was Antony Tudor, who was directing the Metropolitan Opera Ballet.  Although he terrified Sallie with his strict demands, she danced at the Met from 1950-1955.  He encouraged Ballet Theater to rehire her, but before that could happen the company disbanded temporarily in 1958 due to financial problems.  So she joined New York City Ballet dancing in “Episodes” choreographed by Martha Graham and George Balanchine.

Sallie Wilson went on to dance again with American Ballet Theater and achieved fame as a great dramatic ballerina, noted especially for her work with Antony Tudor, in works  such as “Pillar of Fire”, “Fall River Legend” and “Lilac Garden".

Later, she staged Tudor ballets for other dance companies, and taught at the school for New York Theater Ballet.  She said she believed in total involvement in every role, even minor ones.  She is quoted as saying:  “At the Met, I once had to stand still for 45 minutes as Tannhäuser’s page.”

Sallie Wilson died of cancer in 2008.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #48:  
“Sallie Wilson was an American ballerina known for her dramatic portrayals.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Success is almost totally dependent upon drive and persistence. The extra energy required to make another effort or try another approach is the secret of winning.”
-          Denis Waitley


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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Wonderful Wednesday Plateaus


Wonderful Wednesday Plateaus

What is a plateau?  The first definition involves geography:  “a area of relatively level high ground”; but I am concerned with the second definition:  “a state of little or no change following a period of activity or progress.”

Dancers will encounter plateaus in their technical progress throughout their dancing life.  It is disheartening, to say the least.  It is as though a brick wall has been encountered, and no amount of work or sweat seems to make it surmountable.

Take heart!  This is normal.  And not only that, these plateaus periods happen to professional dancers too.   The important lesson here is to recognize them, and keep working anyway.  The plateaus will be overcome.

The problem happens when this phenomenon is not recognized and the dancer begins thinking negatively:  I have no talent; it will never get better; etc…  So don’t fall into this trap.  Keep on pursuing your dancing goals, work through the plateau periods and understand that each one will gradually disappear. 

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #7cc:  
“ Remember that plateaus in technique are normal – just keep on working.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“When we make progress quickly, it feeds our emotions. Then, when there's a period of waiting or we hit a plateau, we find out how committed we really are and whether we're going to see things through to the finish or quit.”
-          Joyce Meyer


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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Terrific Tuesday Effacé


Terrific Tuesday Effacé

Last week I talked about the lovely position, ecarté.  Today is it another beautiful body position:  effacé.  The word in French means “shaded”, and that is what the position hints at – part of the body is slightly hidden from view.

The secret to a perfect effacé devant is to remember that the dancer’s body doesn’t turn too far – both headlights on the hips should be visible in the mirror or to the audience.  The dancer is facing the corner of his/her box as in Secret # 5b: A dancer seldom faces the corner of the room or stage, but instead faces the corner of his/her own box, or square. 

There is a slight arch in the upper back and the head is turned toward the audience and inclined (unlike ecarté that has no incline).  The working arm is opposite the working leg (again, unlike ecarté devant), but the dancer’s face must remain visible and not be hidden by the lifted arm.  The working leg is the one most upstage – furthest away from the audience.

Effacé is a position that is often used in passionate moments in choreography to illustrate intense emotion.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #5e:  
Effacé means “shaded”.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched.  They must be felt with the heart.”
-          Helen Keller

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Monday, September 22, 2014

Mad Monday Elbow Lights

Mad Monday Elbow Lights

When the arms are in à la seconde, the tip of the elbows should face the back wall, and should never face the floor.  But this is a difficult position to learn because often when the dancer rotates the upper arm to direct the elbows correctly, the shoulders lift and round forward, and the elbows lift too high – almost facing the ceiling.  What a dilemma.

The trick is the amount the elbows are allowed to move.  The à la seconde position of the arms is achieved by a lift in the triceps area, and too much lift is the problem.  So imagine a small light located on the “point” or “knob” of the elbow, and have it shine brightly on the wall behind the dancer.  Never allow it to shine on the ceiling, or even high on the back wall.

This light image can work for other areas of the body as well – remember the image of headlights on the hips?

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #6w:  
Imagine a small light located on the point of each elbow.  These two lights face the back when the arms are in à la seconde.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“In order to represent life on the stage, we must rub elbows with life, live ourselves.”
-          Marie Dressler


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Sunday, September 21, 2014

Sunday Waiting

Sunday Waiting

I ran across the above quote and thought how true this is!  Especially so for dancers, it seems.  We are constantly pursuing a future goal, a future dream.  And that’s okay.  But as I said in Motivational Secret #33:  “Today is special.”

You will never get this day back. By tomorrow it will exist, if at all, only in memory.  So don’t race through it quite so fast.  Come up for air and look around.  Notice everything you can, and solidify any good or positive moments in your mind for future withdrawals.  But while you’re at it don’t forget to enjoy the moment!

In other words, don’t be so focused on your future goals that you don’t see and appreciate the things and happenings around you right now.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Motivational Secret #43:  
“This day will never come again.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
““What day is it?"
It's today," squeaked Piglet.
My favorite day," said Pooh.”
A.A. Milne

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Saturday, September 20, 2014

Saturday Secret

Saturday Secret

Most dancers learn that the word “fondue” means “to melt” or “to sink”.  While I do teach this to my students, sometimes the translation can cause too much of a literal sinking. 

As you will remember from Ballet Secret #17a, “A fondue is a plié on one leg”.  Therefore all the secrets that apply to pliés also apply to fondues.  There is always a lift in the posture during a fondue (see Secrets 1b, 1g, 1h, 1m, 1o, 1u, 1cc, and 1ee), and the dancer “sinks” only because the knee is bending.

There is also an important shift of weight in a fondue.  The body must be centered over the supporting leg (and lifted).  A common problem, especially at the barre, is when the student fails to put the torso over the standing leg and instead depends on the arm on the barre for support.

So for fondues, you do melt, but remember the melting doesn’t mean that the body sinks or squashes!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #17b:  
The word ‘fondue’ means ‘to melt’ or ‘to sink’.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“It is a sign that your reputation is small and sinking if your own tongue must praise you.”
-          Matthew Hale

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Friday, September 19, 2014

Fun Friday Ecarté


Fun Friday Ecarté

Ecarté is a lovely position!  Dancers are often told they should imagine the profile on a Roman coin to correctly achieve the line of the head in an ecarté.  This is true.  Unlike the other positions of the body where the head moves a quarter turn plus adds an incline, ecarté is the exception. 

In an ecarté devant, the head turns to the side, but there is no incline (ear to the shoulder) at all.  Instead, there is a slight lift to the chin, and also a slight incline in the shoulder line.  The eye focus is outward and upward, directed well beyond the  raised working arm.  This is designed, as are all the prescribed head positions, to provide a counterweight for the leg positions.
 
Therefore, the position of the head not only makes the position beautiful to look at, but also serves a very practical purpose:  it balances (stabilizes) the position.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #9d:  
“ In an ecarté, the head is not inclined, but directly turned and the chin lifted.”

                Link of the Day:

(Note the lovely ecartés at 2:35)


Quote of the Day:
“Time is a circus, always packing up and moving away.”
-          Ben Hecht

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Thursday, September 18, 2014

Throwback Thursday and Marie Rambert

Throwback Thursday and Marie Rambert

Marie Rambert was such a restless child in school that she received bad grades because of her endless movement.  However, she was extremely bright and most subjects came easily to her.  She began her dance training early and one instructor commented that “in her, was the true spirit of the dance”.  Her parents hoped she would make a career in medicine, but dance proved to be too strong a passion, especially after she attended a performance by Isadora Duncan.

In 1913 Marie Rambert was hired by Diaghilev to teach the company dancers the concepts of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, the originator of eurhythmics.  She was influential in Nijinsky’s choreography of Afternoon of a Faun and the ballet that caused a riot at its premiere, The Rite of Spring.  While she was working with the Ballet Russe, she studied with Cecchetti and later joined the corps de ballet of Diaghilev’s company.

Marie Rambert is best known as a teacher and founder of the company Ballet Rambert.  One of her students was Frederick Ashton who directed The Royal Ballet for many years, and another famous pupil was the choreographer Antony Tudor.  Although known as a difficult taskmaster, she was also known for her great support of young dancers and choreographers, and she helped foster the development of English ballet.

For her part in the development of English ballet she was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1954 and Dame of the Order of the British Empire in 1962.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #47:  
“Marie Rambert founded the oldest English ballet company that is still performing.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“If things go wrong, don’t go with them.”
-          Roger Babson

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Wacky Wednesday Brisés

Wacky Wednesday Brisés

Ah the beloved brisé!  Well, perhaps not as beloved as some other steps, but a fun one, nonetheless.  And like all the other steps in classical ballet, it has its secrets!

The first one to remember is this:  a brisé is simply an assemblé with a beat that just happens to travel.  It also requires a different postural alignment more like that of a standard jeté, with the body inclining slightly forward and a little bit sideways, over the beating legs.  Sound complicated?  Not really.

The biggest secret to a brisé is the plié!  It is important to push from two feet preceding the brush into brisé, and this is not intuitive.  Instead, the body wants to send the first leg out too soon, eliminating the two-footed push – and often the brush - that is necessary.  So in a brisé, always push from two feet in fifth position plié.  It works every time!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #15s:
“A brisé is an assemblé that beats and travels.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Everything starts as somebody’s daydream.”
- Larry Niven

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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Terrific Tuesday and Elevator Shaft

Terrific Tuesday and Elevator Shaft

Last year I blogged about toasters, and how dancers should imagine that every plié is done in a toaster (Secret #2a).  If this image doesn’t work well for you, here is another one:  Imagine that the body is in a tight elevator shaft and every plié is done in this small space.  At no time should the head or upper body come into contact with the wall of the shaft.

It is as though the body itself is the elevator, moving smoothly up and down without any deviation in the shaft.  Think about the opposite:  what would happen to an elevator if it didn’t move that way, but instead wobbled back and forth in a shaft that was ill-fitted for it.  Scary thought.

So plié like an elevator – dependably straight up and down.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #2m:  
“Plié like your body is an elevator in a shaft.”

                Link of the Day:
For those days when you decide to take the stairs!


Quote of the Day:
Giving up is conceding that things will never get better, and that is just not true. Ups and downs are a constant in life, and I've been belted into that roller coaster a thousand times.”
-       Aimee Mullins

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Monday, September 15, 2014

Monday Madness Cut-Ups

Monday Madness Cut-Ups

Today’s subject is that very useful step, the coupé.  The French word means “cut”, and that is exactly what this step does.  It cuts underneath the dancer, enabling a change of weight from one foot to another.  Very useful, as I said.

The problem is this:  often the word ‘coupe’ is used interchangeably to mean the position of the foot.  The position of the foot at the ankle that is most often used when performing a coupé is correctly called cou de pied – not coupé.  The easy way to remember this difference is that cou de pied is a position and coupé is a movement – not a position.

The other important thing to remember about coupé is what its name implies:  it must cut under.  That is, the dancer must shift weight directly under the center of the torso and nowhere else.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #13j:  
“Coupé means ‘cut’”.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Want to improve your relationships?  See love as a verb rather than as a feeling.”
-Stephen R. Covey

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Sunday, September 14, 2014

Sunday Trio

Sunday Trio

Motivational Secret # 26:  Look for hidden treasures every day is similar to today’s thought.  But this is more specific.  Every day notice three things.  These can be new things that you hadn't encountered before, or old things you simply hadn't paid attention to before.  If you are someone who keeps a journal you can write down the things you observe, or not.   Whatever works for you.

Make it a daily goal to notice three things.  You’ll be surprised how quickly this little directive focuses your mind, and makes you see things in different way.  Perhaps the way the light comes across your bed in the afternoon, or how the raindrops form different shapes as they slide down the windowpane…you get the idea.

But make it a priority to notice three things every day.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Motivational Secret #42:
“Notice three things.”  

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. ... In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them.”
John Lubbock, The Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live in

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Saturday, September 13, 2014

Saturday Balançoire

Saturday Balançoire

Balançoire is a term applied to a grand battement when it sweeps front and back passing through first position on the way.  The word means “like a seesaw” and that is more or less how it should be done.  The grand battement should be equal in thrust and height in both devant and derrière.  In other words, one should never be higher or “grander” than the other!

To achieve this, imagine a pendulum.  I know, I know, balançoire means seesaw – but for now try thinking pendulum.  The downward action of the first battement, assisted by gravity, makes the next battement easier.  That is, you need to apply less effort (force) since you have accumulated force on the way down to assist the “up” portion of the following grand battement. Observe any clock or item with a pendulum to solidify this image in your mind.

So let this happen!  Use gravity and the laws of physics to help in everything you do in dance.  It works.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #12c:  
“The word ‘balançoire’ means ‘like a seesaw’”.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“The reason why a seesaw is made for two people is that when you go down, there would always be someone there to lift you up again.”
-          Unknown

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Friday, September 12, 2014

Fun Friday Statute

Fun Friday Statute

Yes, it is time once again for another selection from the Itty Bitty Beige Book of Ballet Statutes, (a companion volume to The Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets).

Today’s statute involves the feet.  In classical ballet, when the foot or feet are off the floor they are pointed (fully stretched); or on the way (transitioning) to becoming pointed.  No excuses here.  If a foot is off the floor it is pointed!   Period.

The reasons for this are obvious.  A limp foot is unattractive, to say the least, but beyond aesthetics, the purpose of pointing the foot for impetus is lost, and also lost is the ability to roll through the foot to cushion a landing.

So remember Statute #22:  If it is off the floor, it points!

From the Itty Bitty Beige Book of Ballet Statutes:

Statute #22:  
“If it is off the floor it points, (or is on the way to becoming pointed).”

                Link of the Day:


Quote of the Day:
“Never let success get to your head.  Never let failure get to your heart.”
-          Anonymous

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Thursday, September 11, 2014

Throwback Thursday and Terpsichore

Throwback Thursday and Terpsichore

Terpsichore was one of the nine muses or goddesses of music, song and dance in Greek mythology.  Terpsichore was the muse of choral song and dance and is often pictured holding a stringed instrument.  Her name comes from two Greek words that mean “delight” and “dance”.  How appropriate!

According to Greek mythology, the nine muses, or nymphs, were daughters of Zeus and Mneomosyne (Memory).  Nymphs were originally protective nature spirits, until such time as the Greeks settled on the number nine, and these nine nymphs became the goddesses of the arts and sciences.

The name Terpsichore also gives us the word “terpsichorean” which means “relating to dance”.  She is probably the most well-known Greek muse, since her name has entered the language in many areas:  some dance academies use “Terpsichore” in their school’s name.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #46:  
“Terpsichore is the Greek muse of dance, from which we get the word “terpsichorean”.

                Link of the Day:


Quote of the Day:
““All of us need to be in touch with a mysterious, tantalizing source of inspiration that teases our sense of wonder and goads us on to life’s next adventure.”
― Rob Brezsny

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Wacky Wednesday Curling

Wacky Wednesday Curling

A great and readily available prop is the common curling ribbon used on packages, like presents for birthdays or Christmas celebrations.  They come off the roll straight, but when the edge of a pair of scissors or anything with a straight edge is quickly run down the ribbon, it curls into a lovely spiral.

This ribbon in its curled state is a good example of the way turn-out in the legs should work:  a constant spiral.  And, as I have blogged about before, the spiraling action of each leg goes in opposite directions.  The important concept here is that turning-out is constant.  It is not something that is locked in and forgotten.

Turn-out is a constant spiral – just like a long piece of curled, curling ribbon.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #20k:  
“Use a curling ribbon to illustrate the constant rotation of a turned-out leg.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
Fear stifles our thinking and actions. It creates indecisiveness that results in stagnation. I have known talented people who procrastinate indefinitely rather than risk failure. Lost opportunities cause erosion of confidence, and the downward spiral begins.”
-       Charles Stanley

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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Technical Tuesday Tights

Technical Tuesday Tights

I have often thought that it would be helpful to have a pair of tights with a variety of lines and arrows painted on them.  It would be a great visual aid for beginners, allowing them to see exactly where things should go.

For example, a single line running down the center front of the tights from the “teotard line” down the front of the thigh, through the center of the knee, down through the center of the shinbone and finishing on the top center of the foot.  Imagine it!

This would help in many areas, but especially in teaching how the knees must align over the feet during pliés.  Simply use the “easy tights line” to line up a perfect plié!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #16m:  
“Imagine a vertical line painted on the front of your tights.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible.”
-Albert Einstein

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Monday, September 8, 2014

Mad Monday and Allongée

Mad Monday and Allongée

The French word “allongé” means extended or outstretched.  In ballet the term is most often used in that lovely position arabesque allongée.  It is a normal arabesque, but with the upper body dropped and extended, with the head aligning with the forward arm.

It’s not that the arm drops, however.  Rather, the head comes down to meet the arm.  This is important to prevent everything in the position from drooping.  And, as we know from Ballet Statute #18:  “There is no drooping in ballet.”

So to achieve the beautiful extended arabesque allongée position (as in the White Swan pas de deux), think of bringing the ear to the elbow – not the other way around.  The fingers of the forward arm send energy outward and forward, whle the arabesque leg sends energy outward in the opposite direction, thus creating one of the loveliest poses in ballet.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #18g:
“ In an arabesque allongée think of bringing the ear to the elbow.”

                Link of the Day:


Quote of the Day:
If I’ve learned nothing else, it’s that time and practice equal achievement.”
-Andre Agassi

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Sunday, September 7, 2014

Sunday Sense

Sunday Sense

We all know about our five senses:  sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell – and according to some, a sixth sense involving intuition or “second sight”.  But I believe we need to develop and cultivate a seventh sense:  a sense of humor.

A sense of humor is something that must be nurtured, so it will grow strong and be available when needed.  This includes small daily needs, like not getting upset in traffic; or big lifetime needs like overcoming grief or disappointment.

So read the comic pages in the newspaper, watch some funny videos on Youtube, or rent some great old comedy movies.  Whatever you like - just make an effort to look for humor.

There are many quotes on the internet about this subject:  simply google “sense of humor quotes”.  It makes for some very interesting and inspirational reading!  

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:

Secret #41:  
“ Cultivate a sense of humor.”

                Link of the Day:


Quote of the Day:
“A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs.  It’s jolted by every pebble on the road.”
-Henry Ward Beecher

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 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!