2 3 4 5 Ballet Webb

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Sunday All Good



Sunday All Good

As we head into the midst of the holiday season, I thought I’d do some Sunday blogs related to giving. I’ll start with today’s quote - one of my favorites.

Whenever you have a chance to “do good”, do it. It doesn’t have to be anything massive, in fact, it is often the smallest sincere kind acts (or words) that resonate the longest. How many memories do you have of a single kind moment? Take a moment and savor that memory.

Now pay it forward. Do something that will give a similar memory to someone else. It will be replayed time and time again, insuring that goodness and kindness will spread into the future.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #43:
Do all the good you can.

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
Do all the good you can,
By all the means you can,
In all the ways you can,
In all the places you can,
At all the times you can,
To all the people you can,
As long as you ever can.
- John Wesley


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Saturday, December 3, 2016

Saturday Worse and Better



Saturday Worse and Better

You may have noticed an interesting phenomenon that happens in ballet training. Some days when you work really hard on something – like pirouettes – they seem to get worse. It’s frustrating, to say the least. But don’t despair!

The next day, as if by magic, the pirouettes are usually better! What happened? I wish I could give you a great, scientific answer, but I don’t have one. But this phenomenon is common in all physical skills, from rehab from an injury, to gymnastic skills, and for dancers.

My theory is that it takes time for the brain to process the new information and I believe a good night’s sleep probably helps solidify everything. That’s why it all falls together the next day.

Just a theory…

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Statute #94:  
“Things often get worse before they get better.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“No matter how much falls on us, we keep plowing ahead. That's the only way to keep the roads clear.”
Greg Kincaid

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My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

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Friday, December 2, 2016

Fun Friday Waving and Winking



Fun Friday Waving and Winking

There are many things in ballet that should be avoided. Today I’m talking about two of them – two of the worst offenders. They are: waving toes and winking kneecaps.

Waving toes mean the energy has stopped somewhere – usually the ankle – leaving the toes flopping around. Gasp! To remedy this situation, simple remember that the energy goes beyond the toes, not just to the toes.

Winking kneecaps. The only time this works is in bourrées, since the knees have to be relaxed for the step to work correctly. Otherwise, the knees need to be straight when required, and there should never be any “winking”, or relaxing the knees in anything other than bourrées. This problem is often seen when a dancer is closing the leg in fifth position, but isn’t lifted enough to allow the leg to come in straight. Then the knees wink from straight to slightly bent. Scary.

Stamp out waving feet and winking kneecaps!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #10hhh:  
“Avoid  waving toes or winking kneecaps.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“One day, in retrospect, the years of struggle will strike you as the most beautiful.”
Sigmund Freud

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My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

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Thursday, December 1, 2016

Throwback Thursday and Pearl Argyle



Throwback Thursday and Pearl Argyle

Born on November 7, 1910 in Johannesburg South Africa, Pearl Wellman was the daughter of Ernest James and Mary Wellman. When the family relocated to England she began studying dance with Marie Rambert and Nicolas Legat. This appears to be when she began using the name Pearl Argyle. She performed with Rambert’s Ballet Club, the precursor of Ballet Rambert.

During this time, Frederick Ashton was a principal dancer with Rambert’s school and he noticed Pearl. He was later said to have called her “the most beautiful woman of her generation”. Pearl soon became his muse and he created roles for her in several of his early ballets, such as ‘Façade’ (1931) and ‘Lady of Shalott (1931).

In 1933, she left London and traveled to Paris, where she performed with George Balanchine’s Les Ballets 1933. But the next year she returned to the Ballet Club where she danced many different roles including Petipa’s Sleeping Beauty. She is said to have been the first British ballerina to perform his choreography of the grand pas de deux in Act III. In 1935 she joined the Vic-Wells Ballet as a principal dancer.

Pearl also appeared in movies, including That Night in London, Chu Chin Chow, Adventure Ltd., Royal Cavalcade ,Things to Come, Three Artists, and Night in December. She married German film director Curtis Bernhardt, and when war broke out in Europe, they moved to Los Angeles. 

On January 29, 1947, at age 36, Pearl died suddenly of a brain hemorrhage. She is buried in Glendale, California.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Dance History Factoid #135:  
“Pearl Argyle was a South African ballerina who also appeared in movies.”

                Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Don't blow off another's candle for it won't make yours shine brighter.”
Jaachynma N.E. Agu, The Prince and the Pauper

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My latest book is a coloring book! It is available on Amazon.

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