2 3 4 5 Ballet Webb

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Super Sunday Pony





Super Sunday Pony

Dancers tend to be pessimists. I’ve always wondered why. Perhaps the field itself attracts perfectionistic pessimists. I don’t know. But let’s talk about how to be less pessimistic.

There is a famous story, slightly gross, but effective. It describes two young boys, one an optimist, the other a pessimist. Their parents take them to a doctor to try and balance out their problems. The pessimist is put into a room filled to the brim will wonderful new toys and he sobs and says: “There are so many better toys available…”

The optimist is placed in a room filled with manure. He runs in excitedly and begins digging. When the horrified doctor asks what he is doing he replies with a big grin: “With all this manure there must be a pony in here somewhere!”

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Motivational Secret #52:
“ Remember the pony.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“You'll never find a rainbow if you're looking down”
Charlie Chaplin

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page:

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Saturday Holding Statute






Saturday Holding Statute

Ahhhh those ballet dancers that look like they are about to turn blue. Not an uncommon problem, I’m afraid. Especially during difficult steps, or vexing combinations, “forgetting to breathe” is a common malady.

Breathing is so critical for everything a dancer does, not just for staying alive. There is always a breath prior to each movement (remember the up to go  down to go up?) that makes a dancer move easily and with “flow”.

It is helpful to develop the habit of reminding yourself to breathe. This is particularly true during stressful situations like auditions, or learning new choreography. But make it a habit every day.

Breathe!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Statute #102:
“There is no breath-holding in ballet.”


Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Feelings come and go like clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor.”
Thich Nhat Hanh

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page:

Friday, February 17, 2017

Fun Friday Ironed







Fun Friday Ironed

I’ve talked quite a bit about how the torso needs to be straight, square and immovable during a pirouette (or promenade) in passé. Here is an image that can help with this.

Imagine your lower body - in passé - from the armpits down, being ironed. Nice and flat and smooth. This is the position the turn or promenade is performed in – with no excessive movements.

Picture this any time you pirouette and it will make it easier.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #14gg:
 “Imagine your lower body being ironed.”

 Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“We are all different. Don’t judge, understand instead.”
Roy T. Bennett

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page:

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Throwback Thursday and Feuillet






Throwback Thursday and Feuillet

Raoul Auger Feuillet was born in 1653 and became famous in dance history for his system of notating (writing down) choreography. He published Chorégraphie, ou l'art de décrire la danse in 1700 which described this method which he created along with Pierre Beauchamp. This system of notation was commissioned by Louis XIV, and became widely used during the 1700s.

This work was translated into English by John Weaver as Orchesography. Or the Art of Dancing and by P. Siris as The Art of Dancing. Both translations were published in 1706.

According to a reference in the Library of Congress:

"This manual details a dance notation system that indicates the placement of the feet and six basic leg movements: plié, releveé, sauté, cabriole, tombé, and glissé. Changes of body direction and numerous ornamentations of the legs and arms are also part of the system. The system is based on tract drawings that trace the pattern of the dance. Additionaly, bar lines in the dance score correspond to bar lines in the music score. Signs written on the right or left hand side of the tract indicate the steps" (Library of Congress, Dance Instruction Manuals, accessed 04-05-2009).

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret:
“Raoul Auger Feuillet was a French dance notator who devised an early method for preserving choreography.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“What I believe to be true I must therefore preserve.”
Albert Camus

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page: