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Sunday, April 23, 2017

Sunday Looking






Sunday Looking

Oh, it sounds so simple. But it is so difficult. Look for the good. Make a conscious effort to look for things that are positive, or uplifting, or beautiful, or just nice.

We humans appear to be hard-wired to do just the opposite. We look for – and even dwell on – the negative. This doesn’t make us happy. 

Try it this week. Stamp out the negative, and look for the positive. It won’t be easy but it will be worth it.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Motivational Secret #57:
“ Look for the good.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“What we see depends mainly on what we look for.”
- John Lubbock

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Saturday Elbow Statute






Saturday Elbow Statute

Yesterday I talked about how the arms usually precede the torso. This is related to today’s Ballet Statute #107: The elbows never lead the port de bras.

That’s right. The elbows never lead. The fingertips lead. When the elbows lead it produces “creepy” port de bras. They appear vulture-like, or bat-like. In other words, creepy. Not something you want, unless it is Halloween or there is some other, similar theme expressed in the choreography.

Avoid creepy port de bras! Always lead with the fingertips, never the elbows.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Statute #107:
“The elbows never lead the port de bras.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“We are all different. Don’t judge, understand instead.”
Roy T. Bennett,

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My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.

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Friday, April 21, 2017

Fabulous Friday First






Fabulous Friday First

The movements of the arms often precede, or lead, the movement of the body. This is especially true in positions like arabesque that move to the position from passé. 

If the arms do not lead, the dancer’s torso moves into the arms, creating a squashed appearance. Then, when the arms open to second (or other position), this flattened shape of the arms causes the elbows to lead . Scary. Because we all know the fingertips lead the arms – never the elbows.

So think about all the times the arms should go first - and lead the movement.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #6ww:
“The arms often precede the movement.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Happiness is always on the other side of being teachable.”
Shannon L. Alder

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My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.

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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Throwback Thursday and Phyllis Bedells






Throwback Thursday and Phyllis Bedells

Born in Bristol on August 9, 1893, Phyllis Bedells studied with such notable teachers as Cecchetti and Pavlova. Her career began in 1907 (she was fourteen) at the London Empire Theatre. By 1914 she had become prima ballerina. In 1916, she left the Empire Theatre and began to dance in musicals at Covent Garden.

In 1920 she became a founding member of the Royal Academy of Dance and was instrumental in writing its first syllabus. She was still performing, and in 1931 was a guest artist with the Vic-Wells Ballet.

She retired from performing in 1935, and devoted her energies to teaching and to acting as an examiner for the Royal Academy. In 1954 she wrote her autobiography, My Dancing Days.

In 1979 the Phyllis Bedells Bursary was established to assist student dancers through a judged competition.

She died in 1985.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Dance History Factoid #149:
Phyllis Bedells was a British ballerina and a founding member of the Royal Academy of Dance.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Curious that we spend more time congratulating people who have succeeded than encouraging people who have not.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson

            Help expand the knowledge base!
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My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.

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Or visit my Pinterest page: