2 3 4 5 Ballet Webb

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Spring Break






Spring Break

For the next two weeks I will be on my annual spring break. The blog postings  will resume after that. Meanwhile, I invite you to read through some of the previous blogs - the site is searchable.

Enjoy!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #1:
“Take time off” 

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Every person needs to take one day away.  A day in which one consciously separates the past from the future.  Jobs, family, employers, and friends can exist one day without any one of us, and if our egos permit us to confess, they could exist eternally in our absence.  Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for.  Each of us needs to withdraw from the cares which will not withdraw from us.”
Maya Angelou, Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now

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 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


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Saturday, March 18, 2017

Super Saturday Shamrock






Super Saturday Shamrock

I am a day late, but in honor of St. Patrick’s day, here is an image that is related to Ballet Secret 1i:  Imagine three dots underneath the foot:  two under the ball of the foot, and one beneath the heel.  A triangle of support.

Instead of just three dots, imagine a lovely upside-down green shamrock under your foot that marks the placement of the three areas of support. Two on the ball of the foot, one on the heel.

Happy Belated St. Patrick’s  Day!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #1sss:
“Imagine a shamrock under your foot.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“For each petal on the shamrock this brings a wish your way. Good health, good luck, and happiness for today and every day.”
- Irish blessing

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page:

Friday, March 17, 2017

Fun Friday Black Hole






Fun Friday Black Hole

I love learning about space. You know, the science of planets, stars, etc. One particularly fascinating thing in space is a black hole. According to www.nasa.gov:
A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light cannot get out.”

This made me thing about the abdominals. The area dancers should think about – probably more than they do. This anatomical area can be  imagined as a black hole. An area that is “sucked in” so completely and constantly that even light can’t get out.

Black hole abdominals!

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Ballet Secret #Irrr:
Imagine your abdominal area as a black hole.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.”
Isaac Asimov

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page:

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Throwback Thursday and Vaudeville






Throwback Thursday and Vaudeville

The term vaudeville that refers to American variety entertainment, came into common usage after 1871. The word supposedly originated from the French vaux de ville, meaning “worthy of the city’s patronage”, according to showman M.B. Leavitt. But the term’s true origin is debated.

Benjamin Franklin Keith is considered to be the father of American Vaudeville. In his home state of Massachusetts he established a museum and built the Bijou Theatre. The programs at the Bijou offered “something for everyone”, and publicity emphasized that the acts were decent and appropriate for everyone.

Printed cards handed to audience members requested:

Gentlemen will kindly avoid carrying cigars or cigarettes in their mouths while in the building, and greatly oblige. The Management
Gentlemen will kindly avoid the stamping of feet and pounding of canes on the floor, and greatly oblige the Management. All applause is best shown by clapping of hands.
Please don't talk during acts, as it annoys those about you, and prevents a perfect hearing of the entertainment. The Management

Vaudeville developed into a popular form of variety entertainment. It usually included a very diverse array of short acts. These ranged from singing groups to animals acts, contortionists, dancers, magicians – you name it! Each act lasted from 6-15 minutes and one evening’s entertainment would have about 13 acts.  

The influence of vaudeville is still felt today, and many famous performers got their start on a vaudeville stage.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets:
Dance History Factoid #147:
Vaudeville was an early 20th century type of entertainment that featured a mix of specialty acts.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:

            Help expand the knowledge base!
 Leave a comment about any instructions, ideas, or images that worked best for you!

My latest books are two coloring books! They are available on Amazon.


Want to know more about me? Read my interview at Ballet Connections:

Or "Like" me on my Facebook Author Page:

Or visit my Pinterest page: