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Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Wild Wednesday Basic Three



Wild Wednesday Basic Three

I have often said that basic movements are the most important. This is because they are elements of everything else. It’s like baking a cake: poor ingredients make a poor cake, while great ingredients…well, you get it.

The three basic movements in ballet are:
Plié (down and up),
Relevé (up and down),
Tendu (out and in)
Now consider for a moment how these three become the “ingredients” in other steps. Wow. It’s amazing.

That’s why keeping these three steps as pristine as possible is so important.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Secret #16u:
“The three basic movements in ballet are: Plié, relevé and tendu.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“Kindness is the basic ingredient for the recipe of happiness.”
― Vikrmn, Guru with Guitar

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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Terminology Tuesday Ouverture de jambe



Terminology Tuesday Ouverture de jambe 

Ouverture de jambe  [oo-vehr-TEWR duh zhahnb]is defined as follows from Gail Grant’s Technical Manual and Dictionary of Classical Ballet:

“Opening of the leg. The ouverture de jambe is a term of the French School; the step resembles the grand rond de jambe en l’air, but whereas the latter is taken slowly and preceded by a développé, the ouverture de jambe is taken from grande quatrieme devant or derriere and is done in one quick movement or stroke, either en dedans or en dehors.”

This may be a version of a step I always called grand battement rond de jambe or grand rond de jambe jeté (see The Link of the Day below). I often include it in grand battement exercises, and in it the working (battement) leg moves in an arc: low in attitude devant to full height in second, finishing in a tendu derriere. For an involved discussion of this step and its variations here is a link: https://dancers.invisionzone.com/topic/53326-ronds-de-jambe-jet%C3%A9s/

  
From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Secret #11m:
“Ouverture de jambe means opening the leg.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.”
― Italo Calvino, The Uses of Literature

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Monday, December 10, 2018

Mad Monday Muscles and Bones



Mad Monday Muscles and Bones

Sometimes thinking about things differently is effective, especially when one hits the proverbial brick wall.

Of course we know that muscles move bones, but what if we imagined that differently? Try  visualizing your bones moving. For some dancers this is a very useful image, and it works on a deep level – literally.

If you are having trouble in some technical area, try it. Move your bones.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Secret #7qqq:
“Imagine moving your bones, not just your muscles.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“You're different. And I'm different too. Different is good. But different is hard. Believe me, I know.”
― Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

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Sunday, December 9, 2018

Sunday Difficult




Sunday Difficult

This describes ballet training perfectly.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Motivational Secret #298:
“Difficult roads lead to beautiful destinations.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“You need to spend time crawling alone through shadows to truly appreciate what it is to stand in the sun.”
― Shaun Hick

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Saturday, December 8, 2018

Saturday Saying Chew



Saturday Saying Chew

In the theater, the phrase “chew the scenery” can mean more than one thing and it can be good or bad.

Usually the saying is negative and means that a performer is over-acting, overplaying, upstaging others and being generally obnoxious and over the top.

However, it can also mean that the performer is performing so well that he/she is stealing the scene in a good way.


From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Theatrical Saying #126:
“Chew the scenery has more than one meaning.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“To take those risks not only do you need to silence the external critics, you also need to let go of the inner critic that tries to worry you about the fear of rejection.”
― Michael Port, Steal the Show

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Friday, December 7, 2018

Fun Friday Blend



Fun Friday Blend

One of the last things a dancers wants is to stand out in a corps de ballet. That’s right. Getting noticed (i.e. corrected) means something is amiss or, more likely, out of line. Scary.

The goal in corps de ballet work is to blend in. Stay in line and make the whole thing look like one entity. It is, in my opinion, the most difficult thing to do in classical ballet. Soloists have the option of covering their mistakes. Not so in the corps.

Tips to blend in: use your peripheral vision to stay in line; and always follow the dancer in front of you – no matter where she goes. It gets easier with repetition and when you work with the same group of dancers for a long period of time.

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Secret #21nn:
“To stand out in the corps de ballet, blend in.”

Link of the Day:

Quote of the Day:
“...originality is little more
than the fine blending of influences.”
― Teju Cole

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Thursday, December 6, 2018

Throwback Thursday and Liane Daydé



Throwback Thursday and Liane Daydé

Born in Paris On February 27, 1932, Liane Daydé joined the Paris Opera School when she was eight years old, and became a corps de ballet member when she was fourteen. By the time she was nineteen she was a star dancer.

In 1959 she joined the Compagnie du Marquis de Cuevas and in 1963 she founded Le Grand Ballet Classique de France which toured the world.

She appeared in films such as Mayerling (1968), La Septieme Porte (1947), Les Malheirs de Sophie (1946), and Us Kids. She also appeared on television in a movie western playing herself, called Das Lacheln im Westen (1965). She also appeared more than once on the Dinah Shore Chevy Show (1959-1960).

Beginning in 1979 she opened her own school in Paris and devoted her life to teaching.

Here is a fascinating article she wrote in January 2013 that describes her dance training: http://www.augustevestris.fr/spip.php?article281

From the Big Blue Book of Ballet Secrets
Dance History Secret #201:
“Liane Daydé was a 20th century French ballerina.”

Links of the Day:

Quote of the Day:

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